“A European Story: EUPL Winners Write Europe” Selection Process

The EUPL Writing Contest will be judged by both a professional jury and the public, who will each choose a winner. There will also be a special MEPs Prize, awarded by Members of the European Parliament, as well as a special mention for Cultural Heritage.

The winners of the four different categories will be announced at the Awards Ceremony taking place in Vienna in November 2018.

Professional Jury
A professional jury, made up of distinguished experts from the field of literature, including literary critics, journalists, authors as well as booksellers, will be judging these submissions in the coming months and choose a winner in November 2018.

The members of the professional jury are Maria-João Costa (Portugal), Nina George (Germany), Juancho Pons (Spain), Cathy Rentzenbrink (United Kingdom), Liana Sakelliou (Greece) and Marnix Verplancke (Belgium). The detailed profiles of the jury members are available on the EUPL website.

Public Jury
The public will also be invited to have their say. All submissions received for the EUPL Writing Contest will be published in an online publication on the EUPL website, which will contain both original texts and English translations. People will be able cast a vote for their favourite short fiction directly on the EUPL website.

MEPs Jury
A jury consisting of Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) will be awarding a special prize to their favourite short fiction. This initiative is spearheaded by Ms Petra Kammerevert, Chair of the European Parliament’s Committee on Culture and Education.

Special Mention for Cultural Heritage
As 2018 is the year of European Year of Cultural Heritage, the juries will be invited to give a special mention to the best short fiction in which European heritage plays a significant role
You can find more information on the European Year of Cultural Heritage on the following website: https://europa.eu/cultural-heritage/

 

The European Union Prize for Literature: 10th Anniversary Edition

Since its creation in 2009, the European Union Prize for Literature (EUPL) aims to put the spotlight on the creativity and diverse wealth of Europe’s contemporary literature in the field of fiction, to promote the circulation of literature within Europe and to encourage greater interest in non-national literary works.

In the course of the past nine editions, the works of the 108 selected winners have been able to reach a wider and international audience and touched readers beyond both national and linguistic borders.

The Prize, which is co-financed by the Creative Europe programme of the European Commission, aims to achieve three main goals: to promote cross-border mobility of those working in the cultural sector; to encourage the transnational circulation of cultural and artistic output; and to foster intercultural dialogue.

The EUPL is organised by a Consortium comprised of the European Writers’ Council (EWC), the Federation of European Publishers (FEP) and the European and International Booksellers Federation (EIBF) with support of the European Commission.
http://www.euprizeliterature.eu/

10th anniversary edition

In 2018 the European Union Prize for Literature is celebrating its 10th anniversary. To mark this special occasion a virtual and physical journey through the literary Europe and special a writing contest, exclusively open to all previous EUPL winners, has  been organised.

The EUPL Writing Contest “A European Story: EUPL Winners Write Europe” is a unique short fiction competition that celebrates Europe, literature and – above all – 10 years of the European Union Prize for Literature.

36 EUPL winning authors from a total of 26 different countries have submitted fascinating European stories with a unique perspective. These stories, written in 23 different languages, are compiled in a special publication along with translations into English.  

To download the collection: http://anniversary.euprizeliterature.eu/book/EUPLbookWeb_acc.pdf

The European Authors’ Group welcomes MEPs’ support for authors

20 June 2018, Brussels –

European organisations representing authors have welcomed the strong support from Members of the European Parliament’s Legal Affairs Committee for a fair and proportionate remuneration for authors, and call upon all Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) to support the Legal Affairs Committee mandate.

Today, the European Parliament’s Legal Affairs Committee (JURI) adopted its position on a Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market.

JURI MEPs backed by an overwhelming majority our European authors’ call for strong authors’ rights by strengthening the “transparency triangle” (Articles -14a to 16a), ensuring regular reporting by publishers, broadcasters and producers on the exploitation that is made of creative works, thus reinforcing the contractual position of authors in Europe.

The Authors’ Group said:
“We thank all JURI MEPs that have made this success possible, and encourage all MEPs to support the Legal Affairs Committee mandate. We also call on Member States and the European Commission to follow the leadership of the European Parliament and show a similar support for improving the remuneration of authors. The Copyright Directive represents a once in a decade opportunity to establish a general principle of proportionate remuneration for authors and rebalance their contractual position in Europe and we cannot miss this chance.”

The Authors’ Group, represents more than half a million writers, composers, journalists, film directors, screenwriters and songwriters in Europe.
The Authors’ Group is composed of: ECSA (European Composer and Songwriter Alliance) EFJ (European Federation of Journalists) EWC (European Writers’ Council) FERA (Federation of European Film Directors) FSE (Federation of Screenwriters in Europe).

Authors urge MEPs to find a common ground and adopt the Copyright Directive without further delay

Author’s Group statement on the Copyright Directive

On 5 July, the European Parliament decided to postpone the adoption of its position on the Copyright Directive.
As representatives of over half a million writers, literary translators, composers, journalists, film directors, screenwriters and songwriters in Europe, we acknowledge and respect this decision.
However, we regret that it effectively delays the adoption of the Copyright Directive, which features essential provisions to rebalance the systemic weak bargaining situation of authors, whose creativity is at the very origin of the copyright value chain, in negotiating their contracts. We now call on all Members of European Parliament to measure the significance of this Directive and to find a common line to ensure that the Directive is finally adopted.

Chapter 3 "Fair remuneration in contracts of authors and performers", as adopted by the JURI committee on June 20th, is a result of balanced compromises supported by an overwhelming, non-partisan majority in the Legal Affairs committee. It secures critical improvements of the situation of creators throughout Europe, and therefore should not be reopened nor amended.
In our view, it is crucial that the European Parliament adopts the Copyright Directive as soon as possible so that it can soon bring concrete benefits to authors across the European Union.
Throwing the Directive away by postponing its adoption would be a failure to deliver any concrete improvement to the situation of European authors and be an appalling missed opportunity to strengthen the creative community and Europe's cultural wealth in the digital era.

 

The Authors’ Group

 

The Authors’ Group is composed of:
ECSA (European Composer and Songwriter Alliance)

EFJ (European Federation of Journalists)
EWC (European Writers' Council)
FERA (Federation of European Film Directors)
FSE (Federation of Screenwriters in Europe)

 

EWC, FEP and IFRRO organise a Seminar on the Copyright Reform at the European Parliament

Over 80 attendees took part in a Seminar on the Copyright Reform organised by EWC, FEP and IFRRO on 2 February at the European Parliament. The event was co-hosted by MEP Therese Comodini-Cachia and MEP Jean-Marie Cavada, rapporteur and shadow rapporteur respectively for the proposal for a Directive on copyright.

When delivering his welcome speech, MEP Cavada highlighted that the technological revolution has led to a new digital era that lives too often at the expense of creativity. He added that there was a need to better protect the use of creative works, which embody the human spirit, and to not only leave it to those who provide the “pipes” connecting content with users to make profit out of it. The introduction remarks on the proposed directive on copyright were delivered by Mr Marco Giorello, Deputy Head of the Copyright Unit at the European Commission.

There were two round tables, showing how solutions to giving easy access to works are being enabled by Reproduction Rights Organisations (RROs) for education and the making available and digitisation of cultural heritage. Two examples of successful library digitisation projects were presented by representatives of the German National Library and the Norwegian National library, that have reached licensing agreements with VG Wort and Kopinor and run extensive digitisation projects. On education licensing, the perspectives from the authors, publishers and RROs were presented, with experiences from France, the United Kingdom, and from Finland by former EWC President, professor Pirjo Hiidenmaa,

In her closing remarks, MEP Therese Comodini-Cachia underlined that over the last months stakeholders have expressed their positions on the copyright reform and these have often proven to be quite polarised. She concluded that it was now up to the legislators to find a balanced approach, and she welcomed stakeholders who have come forward with solutions, while adding that she saw no reason why copyright should not work in the digital world as it does in the analogue.
Source: IFRRO News Volume 19 Number 01 – February 2017